All of Seattle and Washington

By Peggy Studivant

I drive past the house near the Ballard Bridge where Edith Macefield lived until her death almost every day, but I haven’t really looked at it in years. I remember her blue car parked in front, the one just like my father’s. Sometimes I would see Edith Macefield picking blackberries along the fence that separated her house from the garbage truck lot. She looked like my grandmother. I wanted to ask what it was like to live in a place that had gone from residential to industrial. Why she stayed?

The 1900 house is boarded up now, obscured on three tall sides by Ballard Blocks. She wouldn’t sell developers the 1550 square feet that included her lifelong home. The story of a woman rejecting a million dollar offer drew national media. At the age of 83 she was adopted as a poster child for resisting development, anti-greed, co-opted for a cause, wily enough to know it.

05/14/2014
At Large in Ballard: The House of Macefield
Photo credit: 
"Home Sweet Home" by Laurence Landois.

Photo courtesy of Laurence Landois.

As 2014 arrives there are still many things left open in the cannabis industry and pending to be resolved. The Ballard News Tribune opted for a prognosis of loose ends, especially after a study was released Dec. 28 that determines the implementation of I-502 on the local level.

“I-502 Local Implementation” was conducted by CASP, the Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social policy. The study examines the current status of implementing recreational cannabis in Washington State. The study stated that, “Cities and counties were given authority to pass additional zoning regulations. Cities have final authority granting licensing for marijuana businesses, following state approval.”
They sampled the top 75 most populated cities in Washington - Seattle with the most with Cheney with the least.

They categorized cities into four statuses: Zoned, Moratorium, Banned, and No Action.

Zoned was defined as the city council passing legislation that declared areas where marijuana businesses could apply or updated the Municipal Code recognizing recreational marijuana.

01/02/2014
Study shows cannabis  use growing like weed
Photo credit: 
Photo by Shane Harms

This bud's for you: the plant everyone is talking about . Rascal OG strain photographed at a North Seattle medical cannabis collective.

December 5, University of Washington's tight end, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, spoke to over 500 students at the Ballard High School auditorium about the problems of driving while under the influence.

Earlier this year Seferian-Jenkins was arrested in the Ravenna area after being involved in a single car accident. He plead guilty to a drunk driving charge later, and was fined $695 and sentenced to 5 years probation.

“I wouldn’t be doing this if I didn’t think it was going to make an impact. …This whole thing has opened my eyes and given me a bigger perspective,” said Seferian-Jenkins.

Other speakers joined Seferian-Jenkins, two of which were directly involved in his DUI case: Bill Hicks, Seferian-Jenkin’s attorney; and SPD’s Eric Michl, who was Seferian-Jenkins’ arresting officer.

Kelly Jone’s also spoke to students. Jones is mother to deceased, Kellen Jones, who was killed in an alcohol related car accident near the Ballard Locks in 2010.

The message all the speakers had for students was clear, “Do not drive under the influence -- ever.”

12/05/2013
UW's Austin Seferian-Jenkins speaks to BHS students about DUI
Photo credit: 
Photo by Shane Harms

Seferian-Jenkins speaking to over 500 BHS students about the negative impact of driving under the influence.

Friday Nov. 15 eight young women from the Ballard High School varsity swim team went to the state finals. They swam in the 200 Free Relay and the 200 Medley Relay at the King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way.

Tiara Adler, Luisa Chan, Claire Comiskey and Joy Jaeger were the starting relay swimmers with Marguerite Devine-Mraz, Christina Korth, Audrey McFarland and Tianna Lee as their alternates.

In the 200 Free Relay they placed twenty-fourth with a time of 1:47.51 and in the 200 Medley Relay they placed twentieth with a time of 1:57.89.

Luisa Chan and Tiara Adler also competed in individual races. Chan placed 4th in the 100 meter Breaststroke with a new school record of 1:05.22. She also competed in the 100 Butterfly and placed fourteenth with a time of 59.93.

Adler competed in the 100 meter Freestyle, filling seed No. 23 with a qualifying time of 56.56. She placed twenty-second with a time of 57.26.

“It was a wonderful experience for the Ballard girls to compete against the best in the State,” said first year head coach, Barbara Stevens.

11/18/2013
Beavers swim in WA State finals
Photo credit: 
Photo by Shane Harms

From left to right, Joy Jaeger, Luisa Chan, Claire Comiskey and Tiara Adler in the pool practicing before going to the Washington State Girl's Swim and Dive Meet.

Friday Nov. 15 eight young women from the Ballard High School varsity swim team went to the state finals. They swam in the 200 Free Relay and the 200 Medley Relay at the King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way.

Tiara Adler, Luisa Chan, Claire Comiskey and Joy Jaeger were the starting relay swimmers with Marguerite Devine-Mraz, Christina Korth, Audrey McFarland and Tianna Lee as their alternates.

In the 200 Free Relay they placed twenty-fourth with a time of 1:47.51 and in the 200 Medley Relay they placed twentieth with a time of 1:57.89.

Luisa Chan and Tiara Adler also competed in individual races. Chan placed 4th in the 100 meter Breaststroke with a new school record of 1:05.22. She also competed in the 100 Butterfly and placed fourteenth with a time of 59.93.

Adler competed in the 100 meter Freestyle, filling seed No. 23 with a qualifying time of 56.56. She placed twenty-second with a time of 57.26.

“It was a wonderful experience for the Ballard girls to compete against the best in the State,” said first year head coach, Barbara Stevens.

11/18/2013
Girls swim team competes in WA State finals
Photo credit: 
Photo by Shane Harms

From left to right, Joy Jaeger, Luisa Chan, Claire Comiskey and Tiara Adler in the pool practicing before going to the Washington State Girl's Swim and Dive Meet.

Under the looming threat of decapitation by a drug cartel with power and influence compared to that of Wal-Mart’s, O (Blake Lively – Gossip Girl, Green Lantern) decides to go to the mall.

This scene sums up neatly what director Oliver Stone’s (Platoon, Born on Fourth of July) new film, Savages, is about. The film seems to be a commentary on the dangers of getting mixed up in drug trafficking, a glorification of living in excess and an unconventional 21st century love story. All of this is diminished slightly by the movie’s central character, O (short for Ophelia, but she goes by O). It is hard to solely blame Lively for this. O is not only the least compelling of all the characters, but also a slap in the face to viewers anticipating a strong, female lead.

The film revolves around Lively and her two lovers, Chon (Taylor Kitsch – Battleship, John Carter) and Ben (Aaron Johnson – Kick-Ass). Kitsch and Johnson run an independent marijuana growing businesses and have achieved international fame for their exceptionally potent weed.

07/10/2012
Savages: An amusing spectacle with a boring lead actor
Photo credit: 
Photo courtesy of Universal Studios

Blake Lively, center, is not the strong female lead you want her to be.

For Brett Phillips, the 36th District is not just a place he is running to represent in the Washington State Legislature. It’s home.

The 36th District race is packed with candidates this year, including legislative aides Evan Clifthorne and Sahar Fathi, Port Commission President Gael Tarleton, longtime political activist Linde Knighton and Majority State Director Noel Frame. They are running to take the seat vacated by State Rep. Mary Lou Dickerson, D-Seattle.

The Ballard News-Tribune recently grabbed a cup of coffee with Phillips at Uptown Coffee in Magnolia, the neighborhood where Phillips grew up.

He attended the school just down the road, Catherine Blaine Elementary, played little league baseball and became an Eagle Scout with local Troop 80.

He is a fourth generation resident of the district, he said, starting with his great grandfather Joseph Robinson. Phillips is the only candidate to have grown up in the area.

“I have a deep resonation with this community,” Phillips said.

07/10/2012
Coffee with the Candidates: Brett Phillips running to represent his home
Photo credit: 
Photo courtesy of Brett Phillips Campaign

Dear Ballard News-Tribune:

Billions of dollars in savings and added benefits for Medicare beneficiaries were preserved thanks to the Supreme Court ruling that upheld the Affordable Care Act. However, now I hear that the ACA is in jeopardy once again because the Speaker of the House, John Boehner, has decided to hold a vote on July 11th to repeal the entire law.

Apparently, some in Congress would like to take away our benefits such as closing the Medicare Part D prescription drug doughnut hole, annual wellness visits to the doctor and free disease screenings for cancer and diabetes patients. The truth is, the health care law has improved coverage and has cut out-of-pocket costs for millions of older Americans and their families.

Seniors need to call their local Representative and ask them to vote against any legislation that would repeal the Affordable Care Act. Members of Congress have the power to revoke the ACA, but they should remember that seniors have the power to revoke their time in Washington, DC in November.

Sincerely,
Matt Courter

07/09/2012

By Greg McCorkle

An estimated 3,000 people from all over the state of Washington converged on the capitol building yesterday to voice their opinion over proposed cuts to education, social, and health services. Many unions, such as the WEA and SCIU, bused in representatives from as far away as Spokane. Throughout the day people spoke of the need to increase spending for health and education and that any further cuts would drastically effect Washingtonians who already have been hit the hardest. The main thrust of the day was over cuts to health care for the disabled.

West Seattle resident Eric Matthes Coordinator of Advocacy for The Arc of King County has come to Olympia to voice his displeasure over cuts to health care funding, “Because I know it’s important for everyone…people with disabilities want to make enough noise here in Olympia so our governor and our state actually hears what we’re concerned about.”

11/30/2011
Battle for the Capitol - Local residents take part in the occupy protests in Olympia
Photo credit: 
Greg McCorkle

A morning mist hung over the Occupy Olympia camp on the morning of Sunday November 27. Protestors were in the state capitol to fight against cuts in the state budget in education, social, and health services.

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